Category Archives: Plagiarism

Help! I’ve Been Splogged!

I kid you not. Splog is a legit blog term. It’s a spam blog. And it. Could happen. To you! Bwaaaa haaaa haaaa haaaa haaaa….

Seriously. I’m not sure how I found it but one of my snazzy posts that I created for Country-Fried Mama’s new meme (Mmm, Mmm, Memory) was snatched up by a stealthy splogger (try saying that fast five times). This splogger copied it and pasted it and posted it on her site. Granted she gave me credit by adding my site address to the end. But it was a bit unnerving to see it posted there. And there were many others, too. Maybe yours.

I’m perplexed. Flummoxed, even. (I just had to throw that word in there. A friend of mine used it in a sentence and a fairly famous radio host accused her of not knowing what it meant. I think *he* didn’t know what it meant.) So, I’m flummoxed. Stealing other material seems like such a nasty thing to do. Didn’t you have a rule-following English teacher in high school (me) that beat the definition of plagiarism into you (see previous post here)? I suppose by definition you haven’t plagiarised if you gave me credit at the end. But it still feels creepy. And it can’t be right.

How common is this? Has it happened to you? Now I’m going to be looking over my shoulder every time I press the Publish button.

How I hate it when my rose-colored glasses get a smudge on them.



Filed under Plagiarism, Roadblocks, Soapbox

They’re just words!

To educate

“Well, I don’t get what the big deal is. They’re just words!” I was floored. I was a teacher at a small private school. Teaching World Literature. We were studying Dante’s Inferno out of Norton’s Anthology of World Literature. Three students turned in papers quoting, verbatim, sections of the editor’s comments that introduced the work. Word for word. 10thGraders. Been writing papers for about 6 years now. Introduced to the concept of plagiarism many times. We discussed it ad nauseum in a lecture I gave. We even worked on exercises together, explaining how to footnote, how to use the MLA method, how to quote within your paper. And clearly, in bold, at the bottom of the assignment sheet, handed out when the paper was first assigned, was typed: “Plagiarism = O”

I couldn’t have been more clear.

But still it happened. The repercussions are simple, right? A zero to each offender. Nope. Two of the three students were board member’s children. A zero could not be “given” to a board member’s child. Whether she earned it or not. Unacceptable. The head of our Upper School questioned me. “Maybe you weren’t clear about just what plagiarism really is.” The Headmaster called a meeting with the parents and me to “sort all of this out.” I was stunned. The infraction was as clear as day. The proof irrefutable.

I received threatening phone calls from a board member’s wife. She’d have my job before her daughter “earned” a zero. One of my colleague’s called me stubborn. And then a parent of a child that wasn’t even involved called me for a conference. Prepared to talk to her about her son’s progress (he was doing beautifully) we sat down. All she wanted to talk about was this “silly business” about plagiarism and she wanted to know why in the world these girls were in so much trouble. I told her this was between me and the girls. She wouldn’t back down. I told her, “Well, for one thing it’s stealing.” “Stealing what?” she asked. I said, “Another person’s thoughts, opinions, words.”

“Well, I don’t get what the big deal is. They’re just words!”

I don’t have much of a poker face. My jaw must have dropped to my knees. There was no reasoning with her. And I sat there thinking, I get it. These entitled, privileged people, used to getting their way, used to sneaking ideas by bosses to get ahead. They just won’t get it. Words don’t have a monetary value to them. And that’s how it has to be explained to them. With a dollar sign. So just like Martin Luther King in his “I Have A Dream” speech laden with monetary references I explained copyright infringements, how being published is like a patent. She nodded slightly and said, “ohhhhh.” But I don’t think she really got it.

Bottom line? Precious Suzy doesn’t cheat. Precious Sally doesn’t fail. But I fought to keep the zero grade and thanks to an incredibly supportive department head it stuck to their precious grade reports. Needless to say, the rest of the school year was a living hell. I received no respect from the parents and as a result that attitude trickled into the classroom and spread like an insidious virus to the other students.

Words are a precious commodity. Especially when combined to create new and intelligent, thought provoking opinion. Protect your words. Protect the words of others. Respect their value.


Filed under Plagiarism, Teaching